Big Island Videos

Kona Coffee, NBC NEWS

Not all cups of Kona Joe are created equal. A bitter fight between grassroots coffee farmers and big manufacturers is brewing…Lauren Ina reports for NBC News.

The History of Kona Coffee

A documentary about the rich history of Kona Coffee and the generations of immigrant farmers along with the new generation of farmers who made it what it is …

Hawaii’s Big Island Travel Guide – Must-See Attractions

Hawaii’s Big Island, also called the Island of Hawaii, the Big Island or Hawaii Island, which comprises Hawaii County and the Hilo, …

Time-lapse of the lava flow from the Kilauea volcano

Jack Fusco is a professional photographer whose time-lapse videos of the night sky have shown off the night skies in the New Jersey shore, Alberta, Canada and Southern California. To make this video Fusco made more than 9,000 photos where about 6,000 made it into his time lapse called “61g Ocean Entry.” 61g is the name of the flow.

61G Ocean Entry from Jack Fusco on Vimeo.

Kīlauea Volcano Summit Vent Lava Lake

Stunning 4K aerial and ground b-roll of the Kīlauea Volcano Halemaʻumaʻu Crater Summit Vent Lava Lake taken between July 24 and July 31, 2016. Credit: U.S. Geological Survey

Never before seen life spotted by Hawaiian deep-sea expedition

Eight dives into the deep waters of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument of north-west Hawaii have resulted in thousands of samples and images of never-before-seen life and land forms. It was almost twice as deep as any other high density community in the region,” says Dan Wagner, the biology science lead for this year’s NOAA expedition, part of a three-year project to look at… Read more here

 

Pro surfer Billy Kemper wins Peahi Challenge

Hawaii County Civil Defense Lava Update on Nov. 16

Hawaii County Civil Defense on Nov. 16 at 7:30 a.m. HST

This morning’s assessment shows that several breakouts remain active however very sluggish and not advancing at this time. The active breakouts are located in the area of the cemetery below Apa’a Street along the south side of the flow; above Apa’a Street in the area west or upslope of the transfer station; and approximately 200 yards upslope of Apa’a Street to the north of the transfer station. The breakouts currently do not pose an immediate threat to area residents and will be monitored closely. All burning with breakouts is limited to vegetation only.

Smoke conditions are moderate with a light trade wind blowing the smoke in a south southeast direction. Smoke conditions may increase in some areas and residents down wind that may be sensitive or have respiratory problems are advised to take necessary precautions and to remain indoors.

The evacuation advisory for those residents down slope of the flow will continue and residents will be kept informed of the flow status and advancement.

The Pahoa Village Road between Apa’a Street and the Post Office Road will remain closed and limited to area residents only. Access to the businesses and commercial areas of the Pahoa town can be made through the Pahoa Village Road at the intersection of Highways 130 and 132 and the Post Office Road. We apologize for any inconvenience the road closure may be presenting with and remind everyone that the Pahoa town center and businesses are open and accessible.

Civil Defense and public safety personnel will be operating in the area round the clock to maintain close observations of flow activity.

Additional updates will be posted as conditions change.

We would like to thank everyone for your patience and understanding and your cooperation and assistance is greatly appreciated.

Lava Breakout Breakdown (Pahoa Meeting – Nov. 13)

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory on Nov. 13

The past several weeks have been full of suspense and emotion for residents of the lower Puna District of the Island of Hawai‘i. Rather than being restful, recent weekends have been busy with notable events. On October 25, lava crossed Cemetery Road/Apa‘a Street on the outskirts of Pāhoa. Last Sunday, November 9, a new lobe widened the flow along the road, entered private property, and threatened an evacuated home. Just before noon the next day, the house was consumed by fire, the first residential structure taken by the June 27th lava flow.

The Pāhoa community has been in a heightened state of alert for months, following a USGS news release on August 22 that announced the potential hazards posed by the advancing lava flow. Emergency proclamations by the Hawai‘i County Mayor and State Governor followed in early September, paving the way for a Federal disaster declaration by President Obama in early November. This declaration allows local government and qualified nonprofit organizations to access federal funds to help address emergency protective measures and hazard mitigation.

The most obvious hazard is flowing lava. The loss of property and services, associated fires, and threat to community safety by the flow are primary concerns for emergency managers. The lava advance rate has been variable, ranging from negligible to nearly a quarter mile in a day. Planning for evacuations, alternate roads, and continuity of utilities and services becomes more difficult with the inconsistent timing of the lava’s progress.

Currently, the June 27th lava flow is encroaching on residential areas and burning forests, pastures, roads, and other man-made structures and debris. The dense plume, which is frequently visible, is a mixture of volcanic and non-volcanic gases and particles. Although a less overt hazard, poor air quality downwind of the active lava flow can present challenges for some individuals.

Sulfur dioxide gas, the main contributor to Hawaii’s volcanic air pollution, or vog, is primarily released from actively degassing vents at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit (Halema‘uma‘u) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō). However, a small amount of this pungent gas is also released from flowing lava. Individuals with preexisting respiratory conditions, such as asthma, could be impacted by the low levels of sulfur dioxide if they are immediately adjacent to an active lava flow.

When lava comes into contact with vegetation, burning plant material produces a complex mixture that includes carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide gas, as well as various particulates. Vegetation can decompose in the hot environment beneath the surface of the lava, generating gases that can ignite and explode when confined in underground pockets. These explosions occur frequently around the June 27th lava flow.

The burning of manmade features, such as paved roads, creates toxic fumes. In the short-term, molten asphalt fumes can cause eye and respiratory tract irritation. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration notes that workers exposed to asphalt fumes are at risk of developing headaches, rashes, cough, and possibly cancer.

If the June 27th flow continues its forward progress, lava could eventually reach the Pacific Ocean. If this happens, molten lava will react vigorously with the cold seawater, creating a large steam plume laden with hydrochloric acid. A 1990 study by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health showed that near-shore hydrochloric acid concentration decreased tenfold over a distance of less than half a mile, so areas immediately downwind of an ocean entry would likely be most impacted.

The hazards associated with gases and particles generated by flowing lava depend on the flow’s proximity, the items burned, and how the wind directs and disperses the resulting pollutants. Individuals with pre-existing respiratory conditions are the most impacted by air quality hazards, and are advised to limit their exposures and monitor their responses closely.

Information on air quality impacts and health recommendations are available through the County of Hawai‘i (http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-related), the Hawaii State Department of Health (health.hawaii.gov), and the American Lung Association’s free helpline (1-800-LungUSA). A wildfire smoke guide is available at www.arb.ca.gov. Information on local wind conditions is posted at weather.hawaii.edu and under “local graphics” at www.prh.noaa.gov/hnl/pages.

Puna residents are encouraged to stay informed about the progress of the June 27th lava flow. Daily updates are posted by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and Hawai‘i County Civil Defense at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov and http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/active-alerts/.

Big Island Lava Update Nov. 13, 2014

Hawaii County Civil Defense.​​Hawaii County Civil Defense on Nov. 13 at 8 a.m. HST

This afternoon’s assessment shows that the three breakouts remain active and continue to advance. These breakouts are located in the area of the cemetery below Apa’a Street; above Apa’a Street in the area west or upslope of the transfer station; and 400 yards upslope of Apa’a Street. The breakouts currently do not pose an immediate threat to area residents and will be monitored closely. The breakout near the transfer station continues to fill into the driveway area to the rear and south side of the facility and burning is involving the asphalt road material. All other burning with other breakouts is limited to vegetation only.

Smoke conditions are currently moderate to heavy with a light south wind blowing the smoke in a north northeast direction towards the Ainaloa, Hawaiian Paradise Park and Keaau areas. Smoke conditions may increase in some areas and residents down wind that may be sensitive or have respiratory problems are advised to take necessary precautions and to remain indoors. The weather service has forecasted continued south winds for the next few days.

The evacuation advisory for those residents down slope of the flow will continue and residents will be kept informed of the flow status and advancement.

The Pahoa Village Road between Apa’a Street and the Post Office Road will remain closed and limited to area residents only. Access to the businesses and commercial areas of the Pahoa town can be made through the Pahoa Village Road at the intersection of Highways 130 and 132. We apologize for any inconvenience the road closure may be presenting with and remind everyone that the Pahoa town center and businesses are open and accessible.

Civil Defense and public safety personnel will be operating in the area round the clock to maintain close observations of flow activity. Additional updates will be broadcasted as conditions change.

We would like to thank everyone for your patience and understanding and your cooperation and assistance is greatly appreciated. Thank you for listening and have a safe day, this is your

Big Island Lava Update – Nov. 3

Press Conference, Ground and Flyover Video.

 

Big Island Lava Flow Update

Lava flow update from the Civil Defence

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